Everything you need to know about the Leap and FreeRadical.

Found a used FreeRadical and curious if it will fit on your bike? Curious how to buy a new Leap kit now that they are out of production? We hope any and all questions you might have about the Xtracycle FreeRadical or Leap are answered in this FAQ section!

General FAQs

Read this before you buy a used FreeRadical

The FreeRadical is a 20-year-old product that might not be compatible with all our newest products. If you have questions on what will fit, click here to look at the accessory compatibility chart below to find out what items will work with your kit.

Why did you stop making the Leap?

Deciding to discontinue the manufacturing of the Leap was a really hard choice for our team. It was such a great kit and we loved being able to offer it. Here is the condensed version of how that decision was made: When the FreeRadical and Leap were initially designed, the goal was to make these products a low-cost alternative to a complete cargo bike. Originally, when it first came out over 20 years ago in 1998, the FreeRadical kit sold for around $300. When we re-designed the FreeRadical to become the improved Leap, the production cost increased in line with a more complex design that accommodated more bikes and wheel sizes, which was reflected in the Leap’s $599 starting price. We were never thrilled with this price increase since we weren’t able to lower the cost for customers, but when the Leap first came out, it was still one of the lowest cost options to get a cargo bike. As the years have passed, the cargo biking market has expanded exponentially, leading to various lower-cost complete cargo bikes being available on the market. With these new, lower-cost bikes now on the market, we see the Leap as having served its purpose in offering a lower-cost cargo bike option until a complete cargo bike was available at a more affordable price. That coupled with the expanding number of axle, wheel, dropout, and brake configurations made the number of bikes the Leap would work on continue to shrink. These factors caused us to determine that continuing to produce the Leap in small quantities at a higher cost was not the best option for customers looking for a low-cost cargo bike solution.

Does Xtracycle still sell the FreeRadical or Leap conversion kits?

No, Xtracycle no longer manufacturers or sells the FreeRadical or the Leap. Both are out of production and we have no plans to continue to manufacture either. As far as we know, it is not available in the United States and is currently out of production.

Do you have any old FreeRadical or Leap kits hiding in the back that I can buy?

We are so sorry but we are plum outta FreeRads and Leaps.

Do you have plans to bring back the FreeRadical or Leap?

No, Xtracycle does not have plans to bring back the Leap or FreeRadical. If this changes for any reason, we will be sure to update this page.

Can I still purchase a new FreeRadical or Leap kit in the US?

We are not aware of anyone selling new old stock FreeRadicals or new Leap kits in the US. We recommend searching secondhand online sites for someone selling one.

It might be possible to find a bike shop or online retailer selling a Leap kit but we have no way of knowing who might have them in stock. For a few years, Leaps were available in the US through a distributor so various bike shops might have had them in stock. The best way to find out is by searching the “Shop” tab on a web browser for “Xtracycle FreeRadical” or “Xtracycle Leap”.

Can I still purchase a new Leap in Europe?

Yes, there are a limited number of Leap kits available to customers in Europe. These are being sold by our European Xtracycle dealer, Voss Spezial-Rad GmbH. You can reach them at info@voss-spezialrad.de

I’m open to a used FreeRadical or Leap. What are the best places to look for a secondhand kit?

Craigslist, eBay, Facebook marketplace, and online cargo bike groups are great places to look for used Xtracycle conversion kits. You will want to search for “Xtracycle FreeRadical” or “Xtracycle Leap”. Sometimes folks misspell Xtracycle as “Extracycle” so that might be a search term to try as well. Don’t limit yourself to just your city when looking. Many sellers can arrange shipment. Major metropolitan areas with a large cycling community tend to be good places to look for used FreeRadical or Leap kits. For example, the Bay Area, New York City, Chicago, and Minneapolis would be good cities to search for a used FreeRad or Leap kit if the sellers are willing to ship. Even if the seller does not mention shipping in their listing, you can still ask and recommend they connect with a local bike shop to see if you can pay the bike shop a fee to help with shipping.

One bit of warning when buying a used kit: FreeRad and Leap kits come with various small parts needed for installation. When purchasing used, do your best to ensure most if not all small parts are included and any missing parts can be replaced with something generic or something a local frame builder can help manufacture. To see a list of parts needed for installation, please refer to the assembly guides:

FreeRadical Assembly Guide (small parts can be seen on page 2)
Leap Assembly Guide (small parts can be seen on page 2)

I purchased a used FreeRadical or Leap kit but some parts are missing. Do you have these small parts available?

Unfortunately no, we do not have any stock of FreeRadical or Leap parts. You may be able to find a comparable replacement at your local hardware store or a local frame builder might be able to make the missing part for you.

Do you recommend any specific bike for a conversion with a FreeRadical or Leap kit?

Because the FreeRadical and Leap can fit various bikes, we do not recommend any one bike. Please refer to the FreeRadical and Leap compatibility guides to see what criteria must be met for a good conversion. FreeRadical Compatibility Guide Leap Compatibility Guide

How can I tell if a FreeRadical / Leap will fit on my bike?

Compatability guides can be found here: FreeRadical Leap

Where can I find the assembly manual for the FreeRadical / Leap?

Assembly manuals can be found here: FreeRadical Leap

Where can I find more specific FAQs for the FreeRadical / Leap?

More detailed FAQs can be found here: FreeRadical Leap

How did the FreeRadical and Leap compare?

FreeRadicalLeap
Production years1995 – 20132017 – present
Frame tubingRoundSquare
Frame colorSilverBlack
Frame weight3.5 lbs.5 lbs.
Compatible wheels26″ or 700c wheels (some FreeRads were 700c only)20″, 24″, 26″ 650b, 27.5″, 650b+, 700c, 29″, 29+
Max. tire width2.35″3″
Compatible brakesV-brake, linear pull brake, disc brake (with modification)Disc brake only
Torsional rigidityFrame can be flexy under heavy weightFrame is more torsionally rigid 

Are you aware of any other cargo bike conversion kit on the market?

We are not aware of a kit like the FreeRadical or Leap. The closest thing some of our staff has seen is the Caddyrack by Cycle Trucks but we have no personal experience with this product and don’t know if it is still available. There appear to be a few other products out there on the market to convert a regular bike to a front loader but again, we have no personal experience with any of these.

Can you share the FreeRad or Leap technical plans with me so I can make my own?

While we love the DIY spirit, this is, unfortunately, is not something we can help with since the plans contain propriety information that effects our entire product line. We recommend doing a web search for “DIY cargo bikes” – there are a ton of clever builds out there!

I have some super-specific questions. Can y’all help?

Any customer questions we are able to answer are logged here on this page under the FreeRadical FAqs and Leap FAQs. Can questions that have no answer on this page, we will do the best we can to help. While we can answer many questions, some are beyond our knowledge base. Being that the FreeRad and Leap are retired, our support staff isn’t well versed in all the small nuances of a DIY. If we aren’t able to help, we suggest reaching out to folks on the web to see if the collective of FreeRad and Leap users can help you with your question or issue. Good places to check are Reddit, the Cargo Bike Republic Facebook page, and the Motherload Facebook page.

Leap & FreeRadical Accessory Compatibility

FreeRadical Compatible Accessories:Leap Compatible Accessories:
FreeLoader TooFreeLoader Too
X3 CargoBay (discontinued)X3 CargoBay (discontinued)
X3 HiViz lid (discontinued)X3 HiViz lid (discontinued)
KickBack 3 (*KickBack3 Radaptor required)KickBack 3
LT2 U-tubes (**U-tube retrofit kit required)LT2 U-tubes (this modification needed)
LT2 Hooptie (***Hooptie retrofit kit required)LT2 Hooptie
MagicCarpetMagicCarpet
Mini MagicCarpet (discontinued)Mini MagicCarpet (discontinued)
LT1 version 2 FlightDeck (Superhooks required)LT2 FlightDeck (no longer available)
SuperHooks
* KickBack 3 Radaptor (Needed for KickBack 3 Installation)
** U-Tube Retrofit Kit ( Needed for LT2 U-Tube Installation)
*** Hooptie Retrofit Kit (needed for LT2 Hooptie Installation)
Freeloader Straps

Leap FAQs

Please note: The Xtracycle Leap is no longer being produced or sold. These FAQs are being shared for the purpose of helping anyone who already owns a Leap or who is looking to acquire a used Leap. For more details about the retirements of the Leap kits, please refer the the General FAQs section.

What is the Xtracycle FreeRadical Leap?

The Leap converts virtually any adult bike into a longtail cargo bike capable of carrying almost anything: passengers, groceries, or anything else you dream up.

What material is the Leap made from?

The Leap frame is made out of steel, and is exceptionally strong and torsionally rigid. The V-racks holding up the deck are made from aluminum.

Will a Leap work on my bike?

The Leap will work on most adult bikes. Please download the compatibility guide for more details.

What wheel sizes are compatible with the Leap?

  • 20″ (406mm BSD), commonly found on some folding bikes and minivelos.
  • 24″ (507mm BSD), commonly found on some folding bikes and small mountain bikes.
  • 26″ (559 mmBSD), commonly found on mountain bikes, cruisers, some city/comfort bikes, and some touring bikes.
  • 26+/26×3.0 (559mm BSD), found on newer “plus” tire mountain bikes like the Surly Instigator 2.0
  • 650b (584mm BSD), commonly found on some touring and city bikes.
  • 27.5″ (584mm BSD), commonly found on some newer mountain bikes.
  • 650b+/27.5×3.0 (584mm BSD), commonly found on newer “plus” tire mountain bikes.
  • 700c (622mm BSD), commonly found on road bikes, hybrid bikes, cyclocross bikes, some city and comfort bikes, and touring bikes.
  • 29″ (622mm BSD), commonly found on some mountain bikes and cruisers made after 2000.
  • 29+ (622mm BSD) commonly found on newer “plus” tire mountain bikes.

Are there multiple different versions of the Leap for different wheel sizes?

No, there was one version of the Leap. The Leap fits bikes with wheels of many sizes. For more information see our article Wheel sizes for Leap Conversion.

Is the Leap compatible with fat tire bike?

Fat bikes (defined as bikes using 26″ wheels with 4-5″ tires) are not currently listed as supported for Leap conversion. This is for two reasons: first, pretty much every fat bike uses either an offset rear end or a super wide rear dropout spacing, in order for the drivetrain to clear the super fat tire. Since the Leap was designed for bikes with symmetrical 135mm rear spacing, our stock mounting hardware probably won’t work with a fat bike frame. Second, the Leap frame, when assembled as designed, would have trouble clearing any tire wider than 3″, not as wide as a true fat bike tire. However, there may be ways of modifying or fabricating new mounting hardware to match fat bike spacing, and modifying the rear end of the Leap to increase the clearance. If you have a fat bike you want to convert and are up for the challenge of figuring out how to make it work, go for it! 

Can I ride this off road and/or use touring?

Yes, the Leap is great for both!

Does the Leap work with Xtracycle’s child-carrying accessories?

Yes, the Leap works with many older and some newer accessories. Please refer to the chart above for more details.

Can I put a child seat on the Leap?

Yes. The Xtracycle Leap is compatible with Yepp Maxi EasyFit child seats. You’ll need to get the Yepp Kids Seat Adapters.

What are the best bags for my Leap?

The new Xtracycle FreeLoader Too bags are a great fit for the Leap. Other bags that are now retired but would also work are the X3 bags, X2 bags or original FreeLoaders.

My bags are hitting the rear wheel on my Leap. How can I prevent that from happening?

One issue that you might experience if you are using a FreeRadical or Leap kit with a wheel size larger than 20″ is that the bags might bump into the rear wheel or disc brake rotor when full or when a passenger is on board and their feet press the bags towards the wheel. This is caused by the space between the FlightDeck and FreeRad / Leap frame being wider than that of the EdgeRunner (which uses a 20″ wheel) and tension is reduced on the bags because of this. If you are experiencing wheel bag bump on your FreeRad or Leap kit, check to make sure the lower straps attaching the bags to your frame are nice and tight. If these straps are as tight as can be but you are still experiencing this issue, you can use a lash strap to create a barrier. 

This is a super simple fix that can be resolved with an Xtracycle CinchStrap, a lash strap you might have handy or a lash strap from the camping section of your nearest outdoor supply store. You have the option of putting on a horizontal lash strap (green strap), a vertical lash strap (blue strap) or one of each. 

  • If installing the horizontal lash strap on a bike with a tire that DOES NOT exceed past the rear most V-rack (like in this illustration), you can lash one strap around both V-racks as long as the strap is long enough. Be sure to cut off any excess strapping and seal it (with polyester straps, this can be done by slightly melting the end with a match or lighter) or make sure the excess strapping is tucked away and will not get tangled in the rear wheel.
  • If installing the horizontal lash strap on a bike with a tire that DOES exceed past the rear most V-rack, you cannot lash the strap around both V-racks but will need to lash a strap around each individual V-rack. This will require two straps, one per V-rack. Be sure to cut off any excess strapping and seal it (with polyester straps, this can be done by slightly melting the end with a match or lighter) or make sure the excess strapping is tucked away and will not get tangled in the rear wheel.
  • When installing the vertical strap, you can install it on both V-racks with one strap. This can be accomplished by threading the strap underneath the chainstay near the rear drop-out on both sides and making sure it goes over the top of the Flight Deck. If using a MagicCarpet, have the strap go under the MagicCarpet for rider comfort. Be sure to cut off any excess strapping and seal it (with polyester straps, this can be done by slightly melting the end with a match or lighter) or make sure the excess strapping is tucked away and will not get tangled in the rear wheel.

Does the Leap work with the Xtracycle SideCar?

Please note: The Xtracycle SideCare is a retired product that is no longer being produced or sold.

It does but modifications need to be made. The Leap comes with a tailpiece that curves out toward the end of the bike. This allows the kit to accommodate fat tires. Our other bikes and kits have a tail piece that is flat and goes straight across the back of the bike. To modify the SideCar to fit, you will need to: remove the quill bolts and wedges, saw the quill down the fit inside the Leap tailpiece, drill a hole on the SideCar quill that aligns with the welded boss on the Leap frame, then secure the SideCar onto the frame with a bolt through the welded boss that will also go through the SideCar quill. If you do not have these tools available for such a modification, try reaching out to your bike shop to see if they are able to make the modification themselves. 

My bike has V-brakes / cantilever brakes. Can I still install a Leap kit? 

Yes, you can. The Leap kit will require a disc compatible rear wheel. Simply get your hands on a new or used rear disc-compatible wheel to use on the Leap portion of your cargo bike and keep your original brakes up front. You will then need to purchase and install the rotor and caliper. Alternately, you could also have non-disc brake posts welded on by a local frame builder/metal shop.

Does the Leap support 20″ wheels?

Yes, a 20″ 135 O.L.D. rear disk wheel will fit. Currently we don’t have experience with this type of install – a good place to start might be a bike that came natively with a rear 20″ wheel like the Cannondale Hooligan. Other modifications would likely be required.

If I want to take my 26″ mountain bike and put the Leap on, but convert the rear wheel to 20″, would there be any issues with that?

We do not recommend this. The rear wheel of the Leap kit should match the size of the front wheel. I.e. if the front wheel is 26″, the rear wheel should be 26″. If a 20″ wheel were put on a 26″ wheel bike and everything else is kept the same, a 3″+ drop will change geometry, deck slope, steering, etc. which would not be ideal.

Is the angle of the cargo deck shown on on the Leap pictures directly related the the chain stay angle?

Basically, yes. There is some adjustability afforded by the attachment system and depending upon the bike. It is largely driven by the BB drop (CS angle). The photo of the 650b+ grey and orange bike is not necessarily an accurate representation of how the Leap addition will affect geometry.

Does the Leap assume a certain BB Drop / CS angle? IE, in order to achieve a level deck, I would assume there is an angle built into the Leap to keep the geometry of the bike fairly consistent while allowing for a level deck?

Correct. The challenge comes when you try to make one frame work for 26-29+ frames because the BB drop can vary greatly. Henry Kellogg is working on a calculator that will ultimately inform the boom tube angle

Looks like it’s been designed for a mid sized wheel (26″?) and anything smaller or larger will slope the deck aft/fore respectively? Can some “telescoping” be designed in to trim the deck level?

In the intensive 4+ years of development, we explored many of these directions. With your involvement and ideas, the Leap will continue to improve over time. It turns out to be extraordinarily hard to make it affordable and adaptable to ALL bikes/ideas out of the box. However, you’ll find that the Leap Base Kit is highly “hackable” and a fantastic foundation for custom alterations. For deck “slope” it is possible to lift up and clamp the V-racks in the front or rear to make minor adjustments to the deck level (fore/aft). Changing the size of one wheel will change the bike geometry in as-yet-unknown ways.

Are frames with a 130mm dropout spacing compatible?

It depends. If the O.L.D. can be increased on the wheel, it will fit (change axle, add washers). Most bikes have some ability to flex the chainstays/seatstays so 5mm shouldn’t be a problem.

Will the KickBack 1 on my FreeRadical work on a Leap?

No. Essentially, if you get it bolted on, the angle of the plate which rests on the boom tube causes it to not sit flush. You can’t swing the KickBack 1 far enough down to keep it up. I tired it on my Leap at one point and it didn’t work.

How far will the Leap extend my bike’s wheel base?

There are two mounting positions for the Leap installation. One will extend your wheel base by 1’6″. The other will extend your wheel base by 1’3″. The tailpiece of the Leap kit will measure 36″ from the original drop out. The new wheel drop out will be 19″ past the original drop.

Is it ok to attach the Leap stay clamps so that the boom tube is above the clamping plates instead of below? 

Yes. It may be hard to make it work on some bikes but it should work.

What is the weight of the Leap kit?

Leap frame = 5 lbs.
V-racks = 2.25 lbs.
FlightDeck = 2 lbs.
RackLocks = .5 lbs.
cable housing and bolts = 1.25 lbs.
WheelSkirts = .9 lbs.
(Weight does not without the wheel, derailleur, disc brake caliper and disc brake rotor)

How much to the now discontinue Leap U-tubes weigh?

The Leap U-tubes weigh 3 lbs.

What is the maximum rear tire width I can install on a Leap?

3″ wide.

How can I prevent fat tire rub on the Leap?

Unfortunately that’s just a symptom of plus sized tires. On the up side, it won’t really effect the tire or chain in a hugely negative way. You can try re-dishing the wheel to the drive side just a little so the cassette is more drive-side than it already is. Another alternative is trying a bottom bracket or crank set with a wider Q-Factor / more outboard chain line than what is currently on your bike. Keep in mind that these two options are both pretty significant changes to solve a issue that won’t cause the tire or the chain to wear out faster than it would otherwise.

What are the dimensions of the Leap clamping plate?

The Leap clamping plate measures 7.1 cm long by 3.1cm wide with a 1cm x 1cm wide square hole.

Can I use a 160mm brake rotor?

No. The caliper will interfere with the Leap frame.

Why is the Leap chain roller threader?

The threaded portion acts as a “pin” when inserted into the Leap frame boss. It does not actually thread into the boss, but instead sits within the unthreaded boss.

Is there a tow hitch for the Leap?

Cyclefab makes a tow hitch that we have seen other riders recommend. It is $175 and can be found here.

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FreeRadical FAQs

Please note: The Xtracycle FreeRadical is no longer being produced or sold. These FAQs are being shared for the purpose of helping anyone who already owns a Leap or who is looking to acquire a used FreeRadical. For more details about the retirements of the FreeRadical kits, please refer the the General FAQs section.

What material is the FreeRadical made from?

4130 Chromoly steel. 

Where can I find a FreeRad assembly manual and anatomy chart?

The assembly manual is here. The anatomy chart is here.

What bags are best for my FreeRadical?

The new Xtracycle FreeLoader Too bags are a great fit for the Leap. Other bags that are now retired but would also work are the X3 bags, X2 bags or original FreeLoaders.

My bags are hitting the rear wheel on my FreeRadical. How can I prevent that from happening?

One issue that you might experience if you are using a FreeRadical or Leap kit with a wheel size larger than 20″ is that the bags might bump into the rear wheel or disc brake rotor when full or when a passenger is on board and their feet press the bags towards the wheel. This is caused by the space between the FlightDeck and FreeRad / Leap frame being wider than that of the EdgeRunner (which uses a 20″ wheel) and tension is reduced on the bags because of this. If you are experiencing wheel bag bump on your FreeRad or Leap kit, check to make sure the lower straps attaching the bags to your frame are nice and tight. If these straps are as tight as can be but you are still experiencing this issue, you can use a lash strap to create a barrier. 

This is a super simple fix that can be resolved with an Xtracycle CinchStrap, a lash strap you might have handy or a lash strap from the camping section of your nearest outdoor supply store. You have the option of putting on a horizontal lash strap (green strap), a vertical lash strap (blue strap) or one of each. 

  • If installing the horizontal lash strap on a bike with a tire that DOES NOT exceed past the rear most V-rack (like in this illustration), you can lash one strap around both V-racks as long as the strap is long enough. Be sure to cut off any excess strapping and seal it (with polyester straps, this can be done by slightly melting the end with a match or lighter) or make sure the excess strapping is tucked away and will not get tangled in the rear wheel.
  • If installing the horizontal lash strap on a bike with a tire that DOES exceed past the rear most V-rack, you cannot lash the strap around both V-racks but will need to lash a strap around each individual V-rack. This will require two straps, one per V-rack. Be sure to cut off any excess strapping and seal it (with polyester straps, this can be done by slightly melting the end with a match or lighter) or make sure the excess strapping is tucked away and will not get tangled in the rear wheel.
  • When installing the vertical strap, you can install it on both V-racks with one strap. This can be accomplished by threading the strap underneath the chainstay near the rear drop-out on both sides and making sure it goes over the top of the Flight Deck. If using a MagicCarpet, have the strap go under the MagicCarpet for rider comfort. Be sure to cut off any excess strapping and seal it (with polyester straps, this can be done by slightly melting the end with a match or lighter) or make sure the excess strapping is tucked away and will not get tangled in the rear wheel.

What set up is best for carrying children on my FreeRadical?

For children under 4 years old, a Yepp seat will keep them secure on the back. For children over 4 years old, a Hooptie (hand rails – modifications needed, refer to FAQ #7), MagicCarpet (seat pad) and U-tubes (foot rests) will make for a comfortable ride. A Yepp seat and Hooptie can be used together for children of varying ages. Attaching handlebars with a tandem stoker to the rider’s saddle is another low cost option but requires a child to hold onto the bars at all times during the ride. Stoker bars are not something Xtracycle makes but can be easily supplied by your local bike shop or an online parts vendor.

Can I install a Hooptie or SnackBars on my FreeRadical? 

If you have an LT1 or LT2 Hooptie, you sure can! If you have a wooden SnapDeck you will need to replace that deck with an LT1 version 2 plastic FlightDeck and Superhooks. The wooden SnapDeck literally snaps onto the V-racks and while this is not an issue when children are simply riding on top of the deck, this becomes unsafe when you bolt a Hooptie, SnackBars or a Yepp seat to the deck. This is because a simple push on the Hooptie, SnackBars or seat can cause the SnapDeck to become unsnapped from the FreeRad frame. This is solved by replacing the SnapDeck with a plastic FlightDeck attached with Superhooks. Not sure what deck you have? Check out the Deck ID Guide. To install a Hooptie, you will need an LT2 Hooptie and Hooptie retro fit kit. To install SnackBars, you will the SnackBars (with brackets) and a Hooptie retro fit kit. When installing a Hooptie or SnackBars, always make sure your V-racks are locked to your FreeRad frame with RackLocks. If you have an LT1 Hooptie (retired – it used spring pins to adjust the rails) you will still need to have a plastic deck and Superhooks, but you will not need a Hooptie retro fit kit. For more details on installing a Hooptie on a FreeRadical kit, please refer to the article on this subject “What do I need to install a Hooptie on my bike?”

Can I install a Yepp Seat and Hooptie to be used together on my FreeRad?

Yep! When installing just a Hooptie, you will need 4 Superhooks. When installing a Hooptie and Yepp seat or just a Yepp seat, you will need 8 Superhooks.

What do I need to install a Yepp seat seat on my FreeRadical?

When installing a Yepp seat, you need to make sure you have a plastic FlightDeck secured with 8 Superhooks. Yepp seats cannot be installed on a wooden SnapDeck. The wooden SnapDeck literally snaps onto the V-racks and while this is not an issue when children are simply riding on top of the deck, this becomes unsafe when you bolt a Hooptie or Yepp seat to the deck. This is because a simple push on the Hooptie or seat can cause the SnapDeck to become unsnapped from the FreeRad frame. This is solved by replacing the SnapDeck with a plastic FlightDeck attached with Superhooks. Not sure what deck you have? Check out the Deck ID Guide. For both the LT1 version 1 and 2 FlightDeck, you will need to make sure your deck is secured to the V-racks with 8 Superhooks. If you have the LT1 version 1 FlightDeck, you will need a Yepp Maxi Easy Fit Adapter (not sold by Xtracycle) This bolts onto the LT1 version 1 FlightDeck and the seat attaches to the adapter. To install a Yepp seat on an LT1 version 2 FlightDeck, you will not need a special adapter. Holes can be cut in the Flight Deck and the seat installs in these holes the same way they would an Easy Fit Adapter. Instructions on installing a Yepp seat on an LT1 version 2 FlightDeck can be found here. Cutting holes in the deck is not an option on the LT1 version 1 FlightDeck because of its increased thickness. When installing a Yepp seat, always make sure your V-racks are locked to your FreeRad frame with RackLocks. 

What are RackLocks and do I need them?

RackLocks are clamping collars that “lock” your V-racks to the FreeRad frame. They are required if children or adults will be riding on the back deck. They are highly recommended for all FreeRad kits to prevent V-racks from becoming detached from the FreeRad frame. 

My FreeRad broke! What can I do?

Broke bikes are such a bummer! If your frame has broken or snapped, some riders have had success in re-welding the brakes.

I bought my FreeRad used. Is it still covered my the original warranty?

Xtracycle warranties only apply to the original owner. If you bought your FreeRad kit second hand or used, the warranty will be voided and your kit and any accessories will not be covered. 

If I buy a Leap frame, can I transfer my FreeRad accessories to it?

The vertical racks on a FreeRad kit will transfer over to the Leap frame. So anything that attaches to the V-racks will work as long as the LT1 V-racks are installed on the Leap. Be sure to secure the V-racks with RackLocks if you don’t already have them on your FreeRad kit. FreeRad items that will not work on a Leap frame are: LT1 KickBack, LT1 U-tubes, WideLoaders, RunningBoards, Footsies. 

I have a Radish. Is this the same thing as a FreeRad?

Sort of. Before Xtracycle started producing a complete cargo bike (the EdgeRunner), we made a custom bike frame that a FreeRad kit was mounted onto. This is the Radish. So the Radish is a FreeRad installed on a bike frame designed specifically by Xtracycle for a FreeRad conversion. The Radish is retired and no longer in production. 

What wheel size is best for a FreeRad conversion? 

Most FreeRadical were designed for 26″ and 700c wheel size bicycles. 26″ wheels are recommended! 26″ wheels give you most tire size flexibility with the FreeRadical and are inherently stronger than the larger 700c standard. When running 26″ wheels you can fit a tire up to 2.35″ wide. The FreeRadical is not compatible with fat tires or with 29″ MTB tires. 700c wheels will work, but will limit you to 35mm tires (in rare cases up to 38mm), and you will need a 700c Brake Adapter (which is no longer in production) to use v-­brakes (linear-­pull brakes). Disc brakes will not require that adapter.

Please note that there are a handful of FreeRads out in the world that work with 700c wheels ONLY. 

Did Xtracycle use to offer a 700c only wheel kit? If so, can this kit be adapter work with other wheel sizes?

Yes, the original FreeRadical was for 700c wheels only. These original kits cannot be adapted to hold any other wheel size.

Is the 700c brake adapter still available?

Back in Xtracycle’s FreeRadical days, we made an adapter that allowed you to install 700C tires on the FreeRad, using the rim brake mounts for what would otherwise be 26″ tires. It looks like this:

This adapter is no longer in production and pretty tricky to find. Your best bet if you are really on the hunt for an original FreeRad 700C brake adapter is: eBay (they pop up from time to time), Craigslist (AdHuntr is 3rd party site and a great way to search in cities outside your own) or a Google search to see if any 3rd party sites have them (which is pretty rare). If you are one of the lucky few able to get your hands on a 700C brake adapter, the installation guide can be found here.

Another option would be something like the Motolite made by Paul Component Engineering. It will do the same thing a 700C brake adapter did and retails for $146-$156.

Do I need heavy duty rims/wheels for my FreeRad conversion?

Number of spokes/ultra strong rim only applies when you are doing extremely heavy load carrying or long distance touring. We do recommend that you get your rear wheel properly tensioned and trued by a professional mechanic: this will greatly improve the longevity of the wheel.

Can I put the FreeRad on a small wheel bike?

The main reason a FreeRadical cannot be used on smaller than 26″ wheel bikes is that the length of the FreeRadical frame that inserts into your existing bike frame, and bolts near your bottom bracket, is too large for 20″ or 24″ wheel bikes. However, in rare cases, it may work. See the dimensions in the FreeRad compatibility guide to check for yourself if the FreeRadical tongue will fit in your smaller­ wheel bike frame.

Can I put the FreeRad on a recumbent bike? 

In general, no. The chain stays on most recumbents are in the wrong position for the FreeRadical. We recommend the CargoMonster made by TerraCycles as the best option for recumbent riders. Contact them for compatibility.

Can I put the FreeRad on a tandem bike? 

We have seen some converted tandems so we know it’s possible! As long as the tandem meets the compatibility requirements and you are able to get a long enough chain, it should work. 

Can I use the FreeRadical to make an EdgeRunner (26″ front, 20″ rear)? 

No. The FreeRadical and your bike were designed to work with a specific wheel size, using too small of a wheel in the rear can cause the tail of the frame to drag, the bike’s handling to be unpredictable, and your position on the bike to be very weird. Doing this voids your warranty.

What is the best frame material for a bike I would like to convert? 

Different people have different perspectives on material, but some like the pairing of the stiff aluminum bike frame with the more forgiving Chromoly Xtracycle FreeRadical. Chromoly bike frames paired with FreeRadicals are very popular. Generally, we advise folks to stay away from carbon fiber, and butted, super­light, aluminum or steel road bike frames. Simply put, these frames may not be ready for the added stress of a longer wheelbase and heavier loads. That said, bike frame failure due to Xtracycle installation is exceedingly rare. 

What kind of chainstay bridge is needed? 

Ideally, your bike has a kickstand bridge (sometimes called a chainstay bridge). The FreeRad can be installed on this bridge using one Front Attachment Plate and a bolt. Ideally, the chainstay bridge center is between 13.5″ and 15″ from the center of the rear dropout/rear axle of your bike frame. If it doesn’t, never fear, just get an additional Front Attachment Plate and use it and the included longer bolt to sandwich the chainstays. Using two Front Attachment plates is an option for bikes without chainstay bridges.

Will the FreeRad work with my bike’s dropouts? 

The FreeRad has flat profile dropouts that can pose installation problems for bikes with sculpted/recessed dropouts (found on Moots, some older Breezers, and other bikes as well). Remedying sculpted dropout issues often requires removing material from the bike dropout or FreeRadical to get the two to match. This can void the warranty of one or both items, and is only recommended if you feel confident about assessing the strength of your modified bike frame/Xtracycle FreeRadical. For some bikes, this issue can be a showstopper, sad to say. Some touring/trekking bikes are coming with longer derailleur hangers than standard. The horizontal tube of the FreeRad runs within a few millimeters of the derailleur hanger on a stander bike, so this added length can interfere with attaching the FreeRadical. If the distance between the center of the derailleur mounting hole and the center of the dropout is greater than 30mm you will likely have fit issues. The best option is to remove the hanger and replace it with a shorter one if it is available. This maintains the dropouts width and avoids voiding the frame’s warranty.

Is the rear dropout spacing on my bike enough for a FreeRad conversion?

FreeRad is designed for bikes with an OLD of 135 mm (which is common in modern mountain bikes). OLD stands for over locknut dimension ­- basically it’s the width of the wheel (not including the axle). FreeRads can work with narrower OLD bikes (like older 10 speeds, some road bikes, or bikes set up for internally geared hubs). Sometimes this requires stretching the rear stays of your bike to reach around the Xtracycle ­which is less of a concern on a forgiving steel frame than for a less bend­ friendly aluminum frame. If you are facing this, consider contacting your nearest dealer, or call us. 

What kind of brakes does my bike need to be converted with a FreeRad? 

The FreeRadical is designed to work for V-­Brakes or linear pull brakes. Disc Brakes work great, though they require a special setup. Cantilever brakes (also called center-­pull) are not suitable for the FreeRadical ­since the FreeRadical doesn’t have a cable housing stop required for use with cantilever brakes. Road­style calliper brakes are not suitable for the FreeRadical ­since there is no mounting point for calliper style brakes. 700c wheels require a 700c Brake Adapter (out of production but can sometimes be found on eBay) or Paul Components Motolite to use V-brakes (linear­-pull brakes).

Can I use disc brakes on my FreeRad?

Disc brakes require a special arrangement of calliper adapter and disc brake rotor. Why is this the case? Disc brakes were adapted to the FreeRadical after its initial design. Because of the unusual nature of the FreeRadical stays, using the ISO standard disc brake mount wasn’t possible. The only placement of the disc brake mounting tab required the following arrangement: use a 160mm Rear Disc Calliper Adapter with a 203 mm rotor. Avid made some minor changes to rotor sizes (203 mm rotor became a 200 mm rotor for instance). For best results, we recommend following the recommendations above exactly -­ don’t use the new Avid rotor standards, for risk of misaligned disc brakes.

Can I used an internal geared hub with my FreeRad?

The FreeRadical can be used with 135mm spaced internally geared hubs, single speed hubs, and fixie hubs. In the case of internally geared hubs a tensioner (or old derailleur) should be used to maintain chain tension and allow clearance for the KickBack. Without this the KickBack (if used) will rub on the chain. If you’re converting a fixie, chain tension can be adjusted by sliding the FreeRadical attachment back in your (presumably horizontal) dropouts to achieve proper tension: do not use a chain tensioner on fixies.

Can I convert my FreeRad bike with an e-bike conversion kit?

When converting an electric bike, it is important to make sure the front attachment plates will work with the chain stays. Due to the placement of the battery behind the seat tube, many electric bikes’ chain stays will be too wide for the front attachment plate to bridge ­ they must be 2.25″ apart or less where the front attachment plate will cross them. Another important part to check is the OLD as mentioned before and the axle size ­ many e­bike hubs use axles that are larger than the 10mmx1 standard rear axle the FreeRadical is designed to work with. If you’re converting a FreeRad to be electric, keep in mind that you’re limited to 135mm hubs, and always use a torque arm unless it’s a BionX hub. Since e­bikes travel at higher speeds than a regular cargo bike expect more wear and fatigue. Keep the French Nuts and front attachment plate bolt tight, and inspect the frame regularly for signs of fatigue or overload.